Category Archives: Wildlife

Chris Watson Week pt. 04

Guided by Sound

As a natural sound recordist Chris Watson has walked the breathed of the planet to capture the sounds that others only imagine:

Geosonics is a collaboration between Chris Watson and Soniccouture.

However Chris Watson has also spent time on a more local concern and engaged with the RSPB and the BBC in documenting the sounds of birds in the UK. For the whole of October he presented BBC 4’s Tweet of the Day (see the list of episodes in the link).

Guided by sound: Recording the Bearded Tit for Tweet of the Day

Here’s more on how he records natural sounds, this time for the London Wild Bird Watch

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Chris Watson Week pt. 01

In the lead up to guest lecture next week, Monday 2nd December, I will be featuring Chris Watson everyday this week.

Click on the picture for the first port of call:

CW Header

 

[Photo: http://www.chriswatson.net/]

David Attenborough: My Life in Sound

See below. David Attenborough has worked a lot with sound recordist Chris Watson, do not miss this fantastic opportunity to hear them in conversation. More on Chris Watson later.

[Text and image from BBC Media Centre]

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“In an exclusive interview for BBC Radio 4, David Attenborough talks to Chris Watson about his life in sound.

One of Sir David’s first jobs in natural history filmmaking was as a wildlife sound recordist. Recorded in Qatar, Sir David is with Chris Watson (a current wildlife sound recordist), and is there to make a film about a group of birds he is passionate about, The Bird of Paradise. It is in Qatar where the world’s largest captive breeding population is and it is in this setting Chris takes Sir David back to the 1950s and his early recording escapades, right through to today where Sir David narrates a series of Tweet Of The Days on Radio 4 across the Christmas and New Year period.

Presenter/ Chris Watson, Producer/ Julian Hector for the BBC”

Monday 16 December

11.00-11.30am

BBC RADIO 4

Bernie Krause: “a picture is worth 1,000 words but a soundscape is worth 1,000 pictures”

Just added Bernie Krause and the Wild Sanctuary to the links page. He is a leading expert in soundscape ecology. When Rob presented the Sounds of our Surroundings workshop at SeaSwim, we discussed issues raised in Krause’s book The Great Animal Orchestrasuch as the categories of biophony, geophony, and anthrophony. These can also be found in this exciting paper on soundscape ecology published in the Bioscience journal co-authored by Krause amongst other names:

Soundscape Ecology: The Science of Sound in the Landscape

The Great Animal Orchestra is a must read for those interested in the preservation of soundscapes or the effects that acoustic environments have on their inhabitants.

GreatAnimalOrchestraBOOK

I saw Bernie Krause give a talk at the School of Sound in April this year (2013) and, amongst recent anecdotes, reiterated issues from his book such as the dramatic differences in the soundscapes of Lincoln Meadows due to selective logging. There was a significant reduction in biophony, in wildlife inhabitants, and haven’t returned since. He argues that despite the obviously reduction in plant life, the contrast is something that video or photography cannot represent; only our ears and microphones can identify the destructive effect that activities such as logging have on a natural environment.

See his TED talk below!

 

SoundCloud Found Sounds: It’s raining rain!

One of my recordings has made it into the SoundCloud Found Sounds blog this Tuesday:

“The final rain sound for the day is binaural — which means it’s time to take out those headphones! It’s a high quality recording by Matt Barnard, which means that if you close your eyes and listen, you’ll start to feel like you were there amongst the rain, wind, and thunder in Fulford Road, Scarborough.”

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UK SoundMap – The British Library’s National Sound Mapping Project

The UK SoundMap is a currently active ‘community-led’ project that aims to sample the sounds of Britain as heard by you and me, and him and her… and basically anyone with a device capable of recording sound – even a smartphone. Everyone is encouraged to contribute, and should do so. The mammoth project utilises the free AudioBoo web platform to host, stream and map the contributed sounds, which culminates in a comprehensive, soniferous survey for all to browse, research and enjoy.

Why is the British Library doing this? If you need an answer:

Britain’s sonic environment is ever changing. Urbanisation, transport developments, climate change and even everyday lifestyles all affect our built and natural soundscapes. The sounds around us have an impact on our well being. Some sounds have a positive or calming influence. Others can be intrusive and disturbing or even affect our health. By capturing sounds of today and contributing to the British Library’s digital collections you can help build a permanent researchable resource.

The Acoustic Ecology team have started to contribute – check out recordings pinned around Scarborough and Rievaulx, including a thunderstorm, a gurbling river and Civil War weaponary reverberating around the fields surrounding Rievaulx Abbey in North Yorkshire.

In partnership with the NoiseFuturesNetwork, the project has been open to submissions since July 2010 and will remain open until the end of June 2011. The final map will be studied by the Noise Futures Network team and results will be published in time. Go on, upload your recordings on AudioBoo, pin them on the map and remember to tag them with ‘uksm’ for inclusion!

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